Tuesday, February 7, 2012

10 Things I like Better: USA vs Brazil


I found this awesome post idea from a cool expat blog called A Suitcase and Stilettos. I thought I would take a go at the list.

Things I Like Better in the USA:

1. Mexican food. Mexican food in Rio de Janeiro is usually crap and overpriced. It's such a sad Mexican food situation down here that I get excited over wannabe store bought tortillas and Old El Paso spice packets I receive in the mail.

2. The parking spots. I can hardly park a small car in a large American spot, I am totally useless here. Parallel parking skills are so good in this country that Brazilians should be allowed to list it on their resume. "Brazilian Parallel Parker"

3. Couches. You all saw what I went through for my couch. I do love it and it is really comfortable but I have to say it can not beat American couches. In the US we have fabulous soft, fluffy, comfy and sleep inducing couch options you just can't really find here. Of course it may be because it is cold there, we sit on our asses much more than Brazilians, and that we need softer couches that will allow for the spread of our ever growing ass. Whatever it is, they are far more comfortable up there.

4. Candy. Seriously candy isles are a freaking a joke down here. The tiny little "normal" sized candy bar is the size newborn American babies eat. Give me a break and get this girl a real candy bar!

5. Moisturizers. I chalk this up to personal preference due to growing up there. I just find that the body and face moisturizers are nicer in the US. That and they are less expensive.

6. The toy selection. Toys for my kids are SOOOO much cheaper at home. Hell, anything for my kids is cheaper at home. I end up using the vast majority of my suitcase space for kids stuff like future bday presents, clothes to grow into, and shoes.

7. Milk. I do have a brand I like in Brazil now (leitisimo or something like that) but it still isn't the same. I go on a milk binge everytime I visit. Maybe it's all the chemicals pumped into our cows like water. Maybe it's the fact that our milk isn't made to hold for a year on a ridiculously hot shelf in a Brazilian kitchen. I don't know what it is but I have no problem killing a gallon of American milk in the 5 days before it spoils in the fridge.

8. Floss. This is a weird one and I totally blame Mr Rant. He got me into this thin wax floss stuff from Colgate or something. I have to say, it is now my favorite and you can not find it here.

9. Selection. The one good thing about being a somewhat heartless consumer country is the selection. There is a seriously large selection of anything and everything in the US. Hell, look at #8's floss preference. That kind of preference comes from a selection spoiled person. I mean, it's freaking floss, how different can it be?... but it sooo is.

10. The bacon. The bacon here is a little too fatty, too few per package, and too expensive for my bacon taste. I miss the neatly sliced rows of American bacon with the perfect proportion of fat to fat meat and all at a fair American price.

What about you? What do you like better in your Native country? 

72 comments:

  1. thanks for the shout :) and i LOVE reading posts like this because it assures me that norway is not the only place that can't produce perfection in terms of products!!!

    the selection here is probably even worse than in brazil. consumer choices in scandinavia in general is quite lousy. they do have some good bacon here...i will give them that much! floss here sucks too! same with moisturizers!!!

    and the photo of the guy with the bacon may or may not give me horrid nightmares tonight LOL! :)

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    1. I have a Norwegian friend who says the same thing about Norway. She goes shopping when she is in Brazil

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  2. I thought ever growing asses were an *asset* in Brazil. If so then American couches should do well over here.

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    1. lol. Our asses grow out and Brazilians grow down ;)

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  3. The comparison is unfair.
    First World X Third World.

    Vivien

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    1. Well, there are 10 things (more even) that I prefer in Brazil over USA. She was comparing 10 things not the living standard comparison between US and Brazil... so I don't think it is unfair.

      Actually only if you are comparing general population living standard it would be a hands down US win. Brazilian Upper class (top 5%) has a great living standard in Brazil and I don't think they are racing to the airport to flee the country...

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    2. Just comparing random stuff between countries. It isn't anything serious

      I do agree with Marcio about the upper class down here though. They have a damn sweet life that would be really difficult to have in the US for example

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    3. i have been to many 3rd world countries and many have a ridiculously large selection of products and superb quality if that. i think it was just a comparison of the two countries...wasn't mean to be serious :)

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  4. Public transportation, public safety, consumer care/satisfaction, electronic/cloth prices, Chocolate, less bureaucracy, cheap flights to Europe/Caribbean/Asia, good Asian food Thai/Indian/Chinese, world class museum and feeling your are connected to what is going on around the world and corruption on a micro-scale and Snow! we snowboard (only thing that could get us going thought the winter)

    But It is tough to compare another city with NYC

    I will really envy the public transportation, minimal curruption and safety... when we finally move back to Brazil/Rio

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  5. @ Marcio,

    "I will really envy the public transportation, minimal curruption and safety... when we finally move back to Brazil/Rio"

    I think you will enjoy my new, though provoking series.
    http://grittypoet.blogspot.com/2012/02/duh-its-so-obvious-brazil-travessia.html

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    1. maybe a tiny, bitty, little one...


      While not as visually striking and sophisticated as your (minus the picture on this post... it is dispurting for me on so many levels) I did like his blog

      Thanks for the link TGP, quite civilized of my compatriots, makes me a bit more optimistic for out future (will definitely add your blog to my must read blogs list)

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    2. Thanks Marcio,
      Don't forget that my blog also offers hard hitting political analysis.

      http://grittypoet.blogspot.com/2010/11/brazilian-president-elects-hidden-past.html

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  6. Have you tried fresh milk ("Tipo A")? It tastes a lot better than the long shelf life UHT stuff. I don't know about Rio but in Sao Paulo there's even a brand (http://www.leitefazenda.com.br/) that will deliver so you don't have to worry about running to the padaria every morning.

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    1. I haven't but I've heard about it. I hear it sells very very quickly here, though I don't think we have the same brand

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  7. I'm completely with you on the milk and the couches! Come to think of it, you never see Brazilians drinking their own milk straight, either. It's always mixed into cafe or a vitamina or at the very least with Toddy.

    Re: #10 I didn't even know bacon was sold sliced and packaged here. Everyone I've seen buys it in chunks. Maybe b/c it's more common to use it in feijao rather than fry it and eat it plain?

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  8. I'll add somethings that this Brazilian girl prefers in the US:
    - milk: for all the reasons everybody talked about
    - customer service: Submarino drove me crazy when I tried to buy a gift to a friend
    - department stores: helloooo target!
    - cheap cheese: I'm always stunned by the price of cheese in Brazil.
    - online shopping: free shipping and easy returns!

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    1. Target, that word makes my heart skip a beat. Customer service and easy returns get me so damn excited that I have a heart attack

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  9. That's very funny, as a parisian girl, I'm always making fun of Brazilian parallel parking. Reading your post, I guess I would have a blast in the US!

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    1. You'd love it!

      As per Brazilian clothes, I love them. Of course not for their price. I think very few are actually worth paying for them. Note to self, convonce Mr Rant to take me to France

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  10. In my France vs Brasil:

    Bread, cheese, ham, patisseries and clothes are way better in France but meat, fruits and beaches from Brazil are the best.

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    1. Bread, cheese, ham and patisseries (+wine)!!! talk about unfair comparisons...

      You forgot to mention soccer/football as one item where Brazil is (much) better. '98 was a fluke! :P hehehe

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    2. Marcio, I think I wil open an expat shop before you move back and you can keep me in business ;)

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    3. Alas, as you certainly are (painfully) aware, imported goods are ridiculously expensive in Brazil so I doubt I would have the disposable income to indulge myself often on French goodies... and even if I had the extra cash I think it would be too much of a quilt pleasure to do it often :(

      But I think expat shop is a great idea, and judging by the growing numbers of expats (and your insight on what they crave) it would be an success! so can we expect - Mrs Rant imported goods come for the taste of home, stay for the "Momma, Wife, Woman, ex-Pat, American, Brazilian at heart, cranky, Sassy, Ridiculous... " wit and musings over everyday live in Rio!!! - to open? it would be great :)

      Blanche, I hope you got that I was joking about Le Bleus '98 camping, you won it fair and square... instant classic in my book (but it was painful to watch)

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  11. 1 - Cheddar Cheese! Rio has just about any other type of cheese but the real cheddar does not exist or is rarer than an honest politician. Cheddar "food product" does not count.

    2 - Less bureaucracy. Granted we have the DMV and post office in the states but they are the exception. In Rio, all govt. offices are like being at the DMV after a three-day holiday.

    3 - Efficiency in shopping. I can go to a Costco in the states and have five people ahead of me with those massive carts filled to the brim and still make it through checkout faster than if I was behind one person at the local grocery store in Rio. You've got to deal with constant price checks, arguing over the price, the infamous two other full carts that appear hauled by other family members when the "line holder" is at checkout, and my favorite - the cashiers NEVER having any freakin' change!

    4 - I missed Home Depot, Lowes and Autozone. I do all of my own repairs so trying to find the right parts is frustrating at the local mom and pops. I could make the trek to Leroy Merlin but that would be a day long adventure.

    5 - Over-inflated prices for all electronics. 32" lcd tvs in the US are about $260 nowadays. Not so in Rio.

    6 - Structure and discipline in child rearing. This is a big one for me. Like I posted before, I am Mr. "Chato" for trying to raise the boys with structure and discipline.

    7 - I miss the "work first, play later" ethos that is common in the states. In Rio, everyone stops to party or socialize - regardless of some pressing issue that should be addressed first.

    8 - Real milk, sour cream, jalapenos, adobada beef, tortillas, In-N-Out, buffalo wings, microbrews.

    9 - Home brewing ingredients. Yes, I home brew beer.

    10 - I missed the convenience of being able to run to the store 24/7/365 to get something that was needed.

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    1. Cheddar... I think I just cried a little bit

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    2. A foreinger friend of mine had a brain aneurysm (sp?) Rio's last feriado. She woke up (just fine thank God) and you know what she mentioned when I first saw her? That she had found and bought a small and ridiculously expensive tiny block of good cheddar cheese. Her words "Great now because of my being in the ICU my cheddar is going to go bad before I can eat some!" Sadly, I could totally understand her annoyance

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    3. When you say "cheese", do you really mean Kraft's Easy Cheese or another brand of processed cheese-like product sprayed from an aerosol can? :P

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    4. Not at all! Extra sharp real cheddar. Mmmmmmmmmmm

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    5. To be honest, the strange "radioactive orange" gloop that passes for Cheddar in Brazil isn't a pretty sight either...

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    6. Yeah, like Polenghi Cheddar.

      http://www.polenghi.com.br/site/#/linha-food-service/fatiado-cheddar

      Only the purest milk from the cows of Chernobyl are used to make such gentle wheels of yellow delight.

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    7. But there IS a real cheddar you can buy here. I've been buying it at Zona Sul for years now (the one on Dias Ferreira in Leblon). They don't always stock it and when they do they don't stock much of it, but it's fresh, it's mild-medium-sharp tasting depending on the particular batch, and it will cost you about R$20 for a 300 gram block. NOT processed, it's the real deal. When I splurge on cheese, it's THIS cheddar, OR the Lacaune greek-style feta which is even more expensive (the one in my fridge says 260grams, and the cost...R$37.15). Ouch. But sometimes must do it.

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    8. And so sorry to hear about your friend Rachel, thank god she recovered, with a sense of humor to boot!

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  12. How about ATM's that work after 10pm (or 8pm, in the case of Banco do Brasil)?

    This really frustrates me to no end.

    Nothing like having to pay your busfare in 5cent coins because you got caught up in work (or wherever else) and couldn't make it to the bank until 8:01. :( Usually a Banco 24 horas will work, but in Ipanema, there aren't any, BdB machines are cut at 8pm sharp and other banks charge you a R$20(minimum) fee to use their machines.

    Better yet, is going to lapa to find that the debit machine at the deposito is out of order and it is after 10pm and every ATM in the city is shut off, so you either have to a) go somewhere more expensive to drink, b) try to call it an early night (if you can find a bus) or c) spend you bus money on booze and wait until 6am to go home.

    Why call it Banco 24horas (or in the case of Bradesco, 30horas), if it is only open 16hours a day, at most? :/

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    1. i have never had any problems like this at atm. I dont live in rio though.

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    2. Me neither, then again I am anal about carrying enough cash for whatever situation I am in. I was caught off guard once, only a couple blocks from home, and it made everything so much more difficult

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  13. rachel , you should do the 10 thing you like better BR x US

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  14. Cheddar Cheese seems to be a recurring complaint. Regarding that I found an interesting post where an expat in Brazil made Crack-n-Cheese, using a Queijo Reina for Chedder Cheese substitution.

    http://elegantdomesticity.blogspot.com/2011/11/brazilian-take-on-crack-n-cheese.html

    Has anyone out there tried this substitution as well?

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  15. any foreign cuisine, with the possible exception of italian, is a million times better in the US. thai, sushi, middle-eastern, mexican, french...and also 1/2 to 1/4 the cost.

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    1. So true: Americans are masters at making other countries foods, and doing it better. Probably because Americans are a collection of people from all over the place, that really want to be successful in life.
      Success has never been frowned upon in the United States, I sure hope that never changes. Some say it is though.

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    2. I wonder how true that is. Brazil also has a large number of immigrants. Maybe not many Thai but there are loads of Japanese, Italian, Lebanese and German to name a few. Surely some of them can cook a decent dish from back home.

      In my experience, most foreign cuisine is adapted to the local taste anyway, otherwise the restaurants tend to go out of business trying to push weird foreign stuff that none of the locals want.

      I think Americans make sushi for the American palate while Brazilians make it to suit the Brazilian taste and a actual Japanese might find them both unworthy of being called sushi.

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    3. I agree to a certain extent.
      What differentiates America is that there are still many recent arrivals. It ssems that enough foreign born consumers exist so to allow for a more authentic version of various cuisines to be economically feasible.
      This is also the case with ingredients, hence so many ethnic stores and markets.

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    4. I don't know if I agree with this if we are talking about "Brazil" as a a whole...

      Sushi Leblon is expensive, but it is better than anything I've had in the US.

      Sao Paulo easily can give the US a run for Italian food. Minas too, especially the small towns that are full of old Italian grandmas who make delicious Italian deserts.

      In the South you have the Germans and some decent microbrews.

      Rio is great for beaches but not for non-Brazilian foods.

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    5. foreign cuisine is adapted to the local taste!

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  16. This list reminds me of some of the things I didn't like when I lived in Rio in the 1980's. The milk was horrible. The wine was even worse. Given how everyone complains about the cost of living, it might be wiser to live in Florida and visit Rio as a tourist. Convenience is the word that describes life in the US. We have the same problems here in France with large stores closing at 9 pm and smaller stores by 8 pm and all stores are closed all day on Sundays. Some places still close 2 hours for lunch including big DIY places. That practice has been disappearing over the years such that they now proudly say they are open non-stop which means during the lunch hour, not the night time.

    I miss the beauty of the American houses which has a lot more detail in their decoration inside and out. Here in France the house designs lack finesse and imagination. What's more one can live in a house in relative safety whereas in Rio or Sao Paulo, a house is a dangerous place to live.

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  17. The sidewalks in residential areas. American sidewalks are the bomb. So easy to navigate, all smooth and flat and even.

    (I know I don't live there, but this is the one that always comes to me whenever I am going for a walk in Brazil and have to constantly check to make sure I am not going to trip.)

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  18. @ Marcio

    It is Brazilian like you who are keeping our country to enjoy its full potential. US has a standard of living that no country in the world. Its GDP is 13 times greater than China and Japan, the second and third richest country. And China has 1.1 billion people and per capita makes it third world country. Reality is that we have a lot to learn from US despite all their shortcomings. The day that the richest people in Brazil start donating their money, I will believe this country has changed. In meanwhile, I will listen to what Bill Gates and Warren Buffet has to say to change the world!

    Carlos Lima

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    1. Hi Carlos,

      I'm not sure how I'm "keeping our country (from) enjoy its full potential."

      if you think that I for myself can make Brazil enjoy/achieve its full potential. I'm sorry to disapoint, I do not have this power - I am not that good, I can't make this happens in Brazil, I wish I was/had. (Did my "sogra" put you up to this? lol In her view Brazil will enjoy its full potential when we go back...)

      If you think that I'm rich therefore I must have exployted someone/something (and prevented Brazil enjoying/achieving its full potential)I will have to disapoint you again... I am not rich nor a millionare (I hope I didn't give this impression), everything I achieved was due to my work and academic sucess. (I live a confortable life but I am not a Jet-setter, cristal drinking yuppie)

      I not not think that you need "richest people in Brazil start donating their money" for Brazil achieve its full potential... We need education (civic and academic) + more opportunity for micro/small and mid companies. There is today a lot of economic opportunities in Brazil from "concursos publicos" (Petrobras has one every year) to private sector (just look at the number of ex-pat working in Brazil)

      Look at the exemple you of coutries that have good living standards they are all capitalists (yes China only grow after it adopted a capitalist approach to its company), and I can tell you US do offer a great standard of living for people whithout a solid academic degree or have it's own business (just ask the Americans on this board), health care is very expensive if you do not have insurrance, wages are very low for unskilled labor...

      I think historically, you can make a point that the case that economic success of one class (land owners for exemple, high inflation) prevented/was due to exploitation of another (slaves easy exemple)... but this is not the case anymore (since late 1990s), there are opportunities and Higher education is free in Brazil (http://proexc.unirio.br/relatorio_parte1.pdf)

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    2. sorry for the spelling mistakes...


      Look at the exemple you GAVE of coutries that have good living standards they are all capitalists (yes China only grow after it adopted a capitalist approach to its company), and I can tell you US do NOT offer a great standard of living for people whithout a solid academic degree or have it's own business

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    3. "(I live a confortable life but I am not a Jet-setter, cristal drinking yuppie)"

      What a shame: I only hang out with jettsetting crystal drinking yuppies.

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    4. Well, my father doesn't have an academic degree of any kind and he lives well. Quite well, actually ... he has visited me in Spain twice, has two cars, a nice house, and goes on vacation every year. So yes, in the U.S., sometimes people can live well without academic degrees.

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    5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    6. Spelling mistakes galore... had to re-do it sorry

      That's great, I hope he has a long and fulfilling life with many trips to Spain.

      But the current income trend suggests that if you do not have a degree, a skill or own your business your economic perspective are quite limited...

      It could be that the current recession (and NYC cost of living) are making me more pessimistic than I should be...

      http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/17/business/17scene.html

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  19. LOL, I know, My wife sometime says that I'm cramping her style... :) (Just kidding she isn't a "Patricinha" far from it)

    Funny thing is that this view of a "class war" isn't new in Brazil, I guess any country that have such an unequal wealth distribution is prone for having it and he does have somepoints about one class excluding another, but we are seeing this in the US OWS (while I do agree with a lot of what they say and represent) has a few of this re-distribute the wealth mantra which does not have any economic reasoning... Money is both wealth and investment... if you distribute all the wealth you will have a country with no investment (investment in tecnology, education, factories, new business etc) what you need for a better standard of living is economic growth, low unemployment...

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    1. Yep, what Brazil alleviates in racism she makes up in classicism. It is all very confusing and irrational - as is the nature of class warfare - yet so easy to spread.
      Have you noticed though that many of these professed wealth distributors in Brazil are not poor at all, and work for the government? It is interesting that they never want to give up their full pension retirements and all their incredible entitlements, like subsidized PRIVATE health insurance ( nope, you won't be seeing any of these socialists using SUS), but they want those who made and make money in the private sector to pay ever increasing taxes.
      I guess it is a sin to become wealthy via private interprise, but perfectly fine to do so by taxing such people for your own benefit.

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  20. Hehehe How funny. The one and only thing that I dislike about this post is that you preface a lot of the good things by saying something negative about Americans (ie: bigger couches for ever growing asses and the good milk because of all the chemicals being pumped into our cows). You don't preface any of your 10 good comments about Brazil by insulting Brazilians. I feel like this is a symptom of the American living abroad. So many people across the world make fun of Americans so when an American person is living abroad they feel a certain level of shame or embarrassment by their country and to make up for it, they feel the need to make fun of themselves. The United States has a lot of qualities that are way better than Brazil (general quality of life, higher salaries, great selection of products and food, cheaper electronics, flights, cars, food etc.I know that the U.S. is not the greatest country in the world. I'm not one of those but lay off a bit. You're American. Be proud of where you come from and all the good and bad that come with it. Not to make a light post all serious, though. I do thank you for always making my day better. You're hilarious.

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    1. It is a boundary issue. I feel free-er to poke fun at the US and Americans bc I am one. I normally do poke at Brazilians, at least a bit, but I feel they have been getting enough bad press these days. No need for my teasing ;)

      Glad you enjoy my posts :) Sorry if I fall into favoring a side or another.

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  21. Yep, what Brazil alleviates in racism she makes up in classicism. It is all very confusing and irrational - as is the nature of class warfare - yet so easy to spread.
    Have you noticed though that many of these professed wealth distributors in Brazil are not poor at all, and work for the government? It is interesting that they never want to give up their full pension retirements and all their incredible entitlements, like subsidized PRIVATE health insurance ( nope, you won't be seeing any of these socialists using SUS), but they want those who made and make money in the private sector to pay ever increasing taxes.
    I guess it is a sin to become wealthy via private interprise, but perfectly fine to do so by taxing such people for your own benefit.

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  22. Oh I totally want to play THIS game! U.S. vs Spain

    1) since whenT.F. do banks close at 2? When I say close at 2 I don't mean to take a siesta and come back later -- no. Close. at. 2.

    2)Food. Aren't Spaniards supposed to have all this great food? Every city I've been to in Spain had disappointing food choices. Not many restaurants, not much variety.. I think the U.S. kinda has a foodie culture and I didn't feel that there. They were more of a wine and tapas thing which is nice but sometimes you want choices and real meals.

    3) Sushi. REALLY, Vigo? 20 dollars a roll? NO THANKS.

    4) Milk -- that seems to be a common idea.

    5)No cereal aisle. Who can live on 10 options of cereal? I need like 20 options, at least. And all they sold in the way of sweet cereal was frosted flakes. whaaaaa?

    Spain vs US
    1) Cheap and delicious fruit
    2) Cheap wine. NO joke.. a bottle of wine €0.96. WOW! A GOOD bottle of wine would cost like €3.00
    3) Kissing on the cheek and saying hi to everyone. Not the awkward half-wave that us Americans do when we enter a party. An individual hello to each person is nice.
    4)Good Public transporation - come on USA. Get on the public bus train (hehe).
    5) Bars or clubs that close at 6 AM.
    6) Had to throw this in: Affordable healthcare for all (even us foreigners)

    Good god, I could go on foreeeeeeeever but I'll stop. Good post!

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    1. I miss cereal, though we do have a light selection now.

      Bars and clubs opening late rocks when you don't have kids. Now that I have them I can not stomach only leaving to go out at midnight!

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  23. And I'm so in agreement about the parking spots, Mexican food, dental floss, and the bacon. The BACON!!! OMG... I miss bacon SO much!
    Now you know I'm going to have to do one of these posts x

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  24. Agreed. On everything.

    Last week I parked in a friend's garage while visiting. I took me 15 minutes to successfully enter a spot without making contact with other cars or cement beams.

    After I parked (and had taken what I thought was the last spot) an elderly couple entered. They proceeded to exit their car and physically push others around the garage (they were in neutral) to make a new spot... tetris style. SO bizarre.

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    1. hahahaha. I find it so funny that people leave their parking breaks off so that the parking guy can push their cars forward to fit in even more!

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  25. I'm Dutch and I live in the US (since 2001) and lived in Brazil during the 80's (ONE of the most difficult times in Brazil).

    Here we go and I start with the US.

    The US is overhyped. Majority of the people are hooked to cheap MADE IN CHINA products that they buy in Corporate BIG BOX (bye bye local USA) with their credit cards (major debt problem and rising)
    The US has lost it's mojo. Rising unemployment/under unemployed, rising number of people on foodstamps, no access to healthcare, rising homes/aparment foreclosures (decline of the middle class/lower middle class) and more complains about corruption in the government that is in bed with big corporations. Like to complain about basic groceries? Majority of the food is import and the Milk in the US also have chemicals pumped, just as in the water (fluoride)..more than in Brazil where you can still buy RAW milk. In the US in some states you can't buy raw milk, no I don't make that up, just do your homework since the federal government signed the new agri-bill.
    We have inflation here, but the main reason we still have an okay/good life here is because of low prices of gas and food, thanks to the dollar that is still the worlds reserve currency, until foreigners waking up and ditch the dollar (if you do your homework, you'll find out that they are already wakening up and discuss it, what is a problem for us here in the US. If they stop, than we are in trouble). Anyway, that something that Brazil doesn't have. The US isn't fuel efficient, untill that problem what they deal for years isn't solved (as if they want, because the corrupted government talks about it for years)..nothing will change unless the dollar lost more value. Who believes the dollar is still strong, I recommend to check out why gold and silver in dollar price goes up and up (Gold is not only an investment, it's a protection against inflation). Yes, you can read well that life is okay because of the dollar.
    Interest rates are close to zero..what is a nightmare for savers who barely can save.




    Brazil

    Brazil is now in amazing time that is unknown for most Brazilians who know and lived through the 70's-80's.
    Brazil is a developed nation that has a long way to go, though the south is more developed compare to the north and north-east regions. While foreign companies are running away from the US, because of uncertainty, they invest heavily in Brazil. Brazilians buy foreign products that are made in Brazil (like tv's, washers, dryers etc etc) and because of the tax system (that are out-dated) Brazilians pay more include for their made in Brazil products from Brazilian corporations ( for example, shoes, clothes, towels, furniture, etc etc, different style and by the way, made in Brazil products here in the US are expensive but better quality compare to US Brand made in CHINA). As you can read, the US barely produce products like shoes, clothes, towels, hair products, soap. Import tax is high otherwise you destroy your manufacturing base. A nations economy isn't worth much if you are for a big part based on a service economy. Brazilians just like the people in the US, though Brazilians need to do more about education and infrastructure. Again, Brazil has a long way to go, but the opportunties are there.

    I'm not anti American nor pro Brazil. what I type here are just facts of differences of two different nations where they are heading. One is Rising slowly and one is in decline slowly.
    Another fact, majority of people from the US cannot integrate into society in another nation and can't speak more than one language, while the Brazilians can when they are overseas. what a difference.

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  26. Why milk taste different..Brazil vs USA

    cows in the US are fed with gm corn while in Brazil majority are grass feed cows.

    candies..in the US they use sugar from(subsidized)corn aka high fructose corn or gm sugar aka aspertame/splenda.
    In Brazil, they use sugar from sugar cane and stevia (much more sweeter)

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    1. would love to hear your thoughts on the 10 things I prefer in Brazil :)

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